Black Bean and Fire Roasted Tomato Soup

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Watch how this soup is made.

Black Bean and Fire Roasted Tomato Soup

¼ c. olive oil
1½ c. chopped onions (reserve ½ cup for garnish)
½ c. chopped celery
1/3 c. chopped carrots
2-3 medium jalapeño peppers, seeded and diced
3 15-oz. cans black beans, rinsed and drained
8 c. water or stock, or half of each (reducing liquid will yield a thicker soup)
1 15-oz. can chopped fire roasted tomatoes
1 T. ground cumin
2-3 T. ground chipotle chile powder (more or less, to taste)
1 c. chopped cilantro, plus a little extra for garnish
1 lime, juiced
Salt and pepper

Heat a soup pot and add the oil. When the oil’s hot, but not smoking, add 1 cup of the chopped onions, the celery, carrots, and jalapeños. Add a pinch of kosher salt to help exude water and flavor and sauté the vegetables over medium heat, being careful not to let them brown.

When the vegetables are soft, about ten minutes, add the beans, the water or stock, and the tomatoes. Bring the soup to a boil, then lower the heat, and let it simmer for about one hour. When everything is very tender, and the soup has begun to thicken, stir in the cumin and chipotle powder.

Remove the soup pot from the heat, and using an emersion blender, roughly blend it until it’s creamy but you still see some whole beans. If you’re using a blender, blend just a little over half of the soup then add it back to the remaining soup.

Stir in the cilantro and heat again, stirring often to keep the thickened beans from sinking and sticking to the bottom of the pan. Serve the soup hot, topping each serving with some of the reserved chopped onion, a sprinkle of cilantro, and a good squeeze of fresh lime. You can also top this with a dollop of Tofu Sour Cream, but it’s also wonderful topped with broken corn tortilla chips.

If you use less liquid and don’t blend this soup, you can serve it as a stew over rice or day old cornbread.

16 comments
Howard
Howard

Hi Toni, I just started eating vegitarian a few months ago and am trying to amass a collection of great recipes. Before I started eating vegatarian I always watched Christina Cooks on public television but never really thought of starting a new lifestyle. I started watch Delicious TV and have been saved...LOL I love your flavor combinations and recommendations. I cannot wait to try all of your recipes here on the website. Obviously tofu and tempeh are staples in the vegetarian diet. I have tried tofu but have yet to try tempeh. I can't say I'm a huge fan but I'm willing to try them in different preparations. Is there an alternative to them at all? I know they're high in protein which is what they're about because the flavor falls a little flat. Any ideas? Oh and thank you so much for inspiring me and others to live a healthy lifestyle. I look forward to many years of Delicious TV and having you by my side in the kitchen. Ciao Howard

Metric Cook
Metric Cook

Black Bean and Fire Roasted Tomato Soup 60 mL olive oil 230 g chopped onions (reserve 80 g for garnish) 50 g chopped celery 40 g chopped carrots 2-3 medium jalapeño peppers, seeded and diced 3 - 425 g cans black beans, rinsed and drained 1.9 L water or stock, or half of each (reducing liquid will yield a thicker soup) 1 425 g can chopped fire roasted tomatoes 15 mL ground cumin 30-45 mL ground chipotle chile powder (more or less, to taste) 240 mL chopped cilantro, plus a little extra for garnish 1 lime, juiced Salt and pepper Heat a soup pot and add the oil. When the oil’s hot, but not smoking, add 150 g of the chopped onions, the celery, carrots, and jalapeños. Add a pinch of kosher salt to help exude water and flavor and sauté the vegetables over medium heat, being careful not to let them brown.

Donna Skaggs
Donna Skaggs

This is the best soup recipe I've had in a long time! However, I left out all the jalapenos and used only a scant 1/2 tsp. of chipotle powder. This was plenty zesty for my husband and I. I make my own chipotle powder by just putting the dried chipotle peppers into my spice grinder (coffee grinder) and whizzing until evenly ground up. This is much cheaper than a purchased powder and much fresher. Do make the tofu sour cream to dollop in the middle - wow, so good! Toni - please create some dip recipes with the tofu sour cream as a base, ok?

TFR
TFR

I am so looking forward to this recipe - in the video Toni says she is adding 1 cup carrots but the recipe above only calls for 1/3 cup - which is it? Thanks!

Sunshine
Sunshine

This recipe was AWESOME. I added some garlic to it. Also, after I blended half of it and put it back in, I added a large can of diced tomatoes to help with the spice. My husband LOVED it, too which was surprising!

Aces
Aces

This is great as a burrito filler!

Mr. Designer
Mr. Designer

This soup was a little too hot and I only put in 1 Jalapeno with seeds and the chipolte chili powder, which I found at the grocery store with the higher end McCormick spices in the green/black glass containers. I'm gonna make it again with less chili powder.

Chef
Chef

Hi Pauli, Thanks for writing with a great question. A fifteen ounce can is equivalent to 3/4 Cup of dried. For substituting, I'm not sure what you might be looking for. Chipotle peppers can be purchased dry if you can't find cans, and the fire roasted tomatoes can simply be substituted with regular if necessary. You might find a product called liquid smoke, which a few drops will give a smokey flavor to tomatoes or soups. If you could be more specific, I can be more helpful. Take care. Toni

Pauli Guld
Pauli Guld

I saw your program for the first time on PPTV and enjoyed your recipes very much. I wonder whether you can give me the approximate eqivalents when cooking beans from scratch to the amount in cans.. Also, I live in Canada and find it haard to locate "Mexican" canned products in our markets. I'd appreciate suitable substitutes if possible. Thanks.

Chef
Chef

I don't know where you live, but you should be able to find chipotle powder in any whole food or latin market. I usually buy my spices in those locations since they're cheaper than most grocery stores. You may also substitute canned chilies, which are usually packed in adobo sauce however there's usually a bit of a tomato vinegar aftertaste to go along with it. In this recipe it won't make too much of a difference, but you may want to rinse them before using. The powder has a cleaner closer to fresh roasted flavor and I think very well worth having on hand. To substitute I'd start with 1 chili per tablespoon, but an acurate measurement is hard to determine because chili size varies so do this by taste. As far as nutritional information goes, we are looking into that soon. For the moment all I can say is the majority of my recipes are very low fat, especially those that don't use processed food. The oil I use is also pretty adjustable. I've always taken a common sense approach to cooking and ingredients and can usually tell just by looking if a recipe will fit into a lowfat healthy diet plan and those are the recipes I generally choose. Stay tuned, I hope to have more information in this area soon! Thanks for writing and asking a great question!

karen
karen

I was also wondering where I would find ground chipotle chili powder. I have used canned chipotle chilis in other recipes but have never seen this kind of chili powder where I shop. Do I have to go to Penzey's or another mail order place to find it? Thanks, Karen

karen
karen

I wonder if you could give any nutritional information for your recipes. They sound wonderful but I am trying to keep the calories/fat/salt in my diet low. It would be nice to know how much I am eating of all these things!! Thanks

Chef
Chef

Hi Denise, I have 1/4 cup as a measurement for this recipe. You can go a little less or use vegetable oil as a substitute. Toni

Denise Snow
Denise Snow

How much olive oil is to be used in the Black Bean soup?

Toni Fiore
Toni Fiore

Hi Howard, Thank you so much for your letter and for all of your kind and positive comments! Tempeh and Tofu are indeed a big part of my basic ingredients to many but certainly not all of my dishes. In terms of flavor I strongly suggest you try any of the marinated Tempeh and Tofu recipes I have available in my book "Totally Vegetarian" and on our Podcast VegEZ. The Podcast is available on iTunes and our website. You'll be very pleasantly surprised at how flavorful both Tempeh and Tofu are when prepared according to those recipes. As far as alternatives go you might want to try Seitan or any prepared vegetarian alternatives available in supermarkets. While I like the convenience of prepared foods from time to time I'm not a big fan of relying on processed foods in my overall diet. That said I'm pretty certain you will become a big fan of Tempeh and Tofu once you try any of my marinated versions. Tempeh has such a great texture and is not only very healthy it's very easily digestible. Stay in touch and let us know what you've tried and how things are working out for you. Feel free to write with questions or comments! Toni

admin
admin

The recipe calls for one medium carrot, which is about 1/3 of a cup. Enjoy the recipe!

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  1. […] Fiore’s Black Bean Soup recipe can be found here.  EPC only adds 1 -2 teaspoons of chipotle chili powder and 1 jalapeno.  The soup is too spicy […]