Everyday Thanksgiving Tofu Pot Pie

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Versatile, easy to prepare, and delicious, a pot pie is perfect for any night of the week or for a festive vegetarian holiday meal, served with all the traditional trimmings. We love this with our tart, crisp Fruit Chutney.
Using pre-made pie crust makes preparation even easier for stress free entertaining. These individual pot pies are fun for children who especially love digging into their very own little pie, but of course you can make it in one big casserole dish. If you’re rushing, you could also substitute the tofu with Quorn Chik’n Tenders, Veat Gourmet Bites or Morningstar Farms Meal Starters Chik’n Strips .

Serves 4

Ingredients:
1 pkg. vegetarian pie crust or one recipe (below) whole wheat pastry crust
1 pkg. extra firm tofu, drained, pressed, and cubed
2 medium carrots, peeled and diced
2 stalks of celery, diced
1 large onion, diced
1 medium potato, peeled and diced
8 T. flour
8 T. vegetable oil or vegan margarine
4-5 c. of vegetable stock, at room temperature
1 c. frozen petite green peas
1/2 c. chopped fresh parsley
Optional 8 rough chopped baby portabella mushrooms, chopped fresh dill, 2 T. capers
Oil for frying

To prepare:
In a heavy skillet, heat 5 tablespoons of vegetable oil. Add the tofu cubes and cook over medium heat until nicely browned and crispy, then remove and drain on paper towels. (If you decide to use a pre-made meat substitute instead of tofu you will not need to pre-cook it, just add it with your parsley and peas).

Add a little more oil to the pan then throw in the onions, carrots, celery, and potato (and optional mushrooms). Cook the vegetables until they are crisp tender, about 10 minutes. Now add remaining oil to the pan and heat it thoroughly before sprinkling in the flour. Toss everything gently to coat the vegetables evenly with flour and continue to cook for an additional 2 minutes. Slowly begin adding the vegetable stock, stirring constantly until a rich gravy develops. Even though the gravy may look a little thin at first, it will thicken in the oven during the baking. Finally, add the peas, parsley, and any of the optional ingredients, season with salt and pepper, and set aside.

Preheat your oven to 350 degrees and with cooking spray, prepare four medium-sized, single serving ramekins or small individual foil pans. Fill each ramekin with the gravy-vegetable mixture. Cover with pastry and crimp sides.

Bake until the crust is a nice golden brown, about 45 minutes to an hour, depending upon your oven. Remove the pot pies and set them aside to cool for a few minutes, then dig in.

Note: Pot pies can also be frozen. To reheat, simply remove them from the freezer, cover with aluminum foil for the first 10 minutes of baking, then place them in a preheated oven and bake until hot and the crust is browned, about another 30-40 minutes.

To make whole wheat crust, follow the following instructions. This recipe makes two 9″ crusts.

Ingredients:
2 c. whole wheat pastry flour
1 t. sea salt
3/4 c. vegan margarine
5-6 T. ice water

Cut margarine into sifted flour until it resembles coarse meal. The crumbs should be in about pea size pieces. Sprinkle some ice water over the mixture, a tablespoon at a time, and knead lightly just until dough comes together into a ball. Cut the dough ball in half and shape each half into a disc. Wrap each disc in wax paper and chill for about half and hour, then roll out and press the bottom crust into a deep casserole dish. Add pot pie filling and top with second crust, crimping the edges. Vent the crust with a sharp knife.

10 comments
Amanda
Amanda

Help: I watched Episode 43 on itunes and this recipe does NOT jive with it. I'd like to make the one on itunes, as it looks easier.

Veg Royale
Veg Royale

Amanda - this is a completely different recipe - Toni has created two pot pie recipes and the VegEZ podcast recipe you're referencing is not yet available. Stay tuned & check back. Thanks for posting.

Chef
Chef

Thank for writing back Josh. I did ask one of my better baker friends about Earth Balance soy margarine, and she liked it. As far as fat goes, while the fats are different, the fat content is still the same. Just thought I'd share that with you. Good luck and keep in touch. Toni

Josh
Josh

Thanks very much for that answer, Toni. I'm starting to think that I've now had the same experiences you mention-- vegetable fat is fine for crusts, but thicker things (like for this pot pie) just need butter. Thanks for the validation-- and great cooking tips!

Chef
Chef

Hi Rae, Basically that means seaweed. There are many varieties available dried, flaked or ground. I usually use dulse powder or nori (the seaweed sheets typically used in sushi rolls) A little sprinkle of dulse or chopped nori adds a nice sea briny flavor to many foods. I especially like it in my Mock Maryland Crabcakes. If you can't find them in your local market they're available online. I like Maine Coast Sea Vegetables because they're local and quite helpful. Check out www.seaveg.com for some very useful information, recipes and tips. Thanks for writing, nice to hear from you again! Toni

Rae
Rae

Hi Toni, I've just been browsing your tempeh recipes and need help. What are sea vegetables? They're in the mockfish recipe.

melody polakow
melody polakow

I am so excited to find your blog! I love your cooking show. I'm in New Hampshire and it's so refreshing to see a vegetarian and mostly vegan show! Keep up the great work.

Newyorkerbyheart
Newyorkerbyheart

Hi Toni, I'm a 30-something girl from Denmark and I have subscribed to your podcast on Ipod and you are so inspiring to watch. I LOVE to cook, but have never tried anything with tofu or made truly vegetarion food - but you have inspired me!! I haven't made any of your recipes yet, but I'm going to, my New Year resolution is, so make vegetarian food once a week :-) Thank you for your inspiration and for the wonderful podcasts.....I wish I could watch your TV-shows. My best, Birthe from Denmark PS: I do have my own foodblog, it's in Danish, but has lots of pictures.....but it's non-vegetarian...

Chef
Chef

Hi Josh, I have made it a habit of looking for lower fat options with most of my cooking and done so with great success, however there are times where I like to cut myself some slack. I'm not an extremely successful baker and I don't often make pastry, so with that as the start point, when I do bake I'll stick with a recipe that (a) is easy (b) tastes good and (c) works virtually all of the time. I have used vegetable shortening (even that weird butter tasting stuff), with unbleached white flour in pie crusts with good results but with this recipe I really liked the flavor real butter imparted on the whole wheat crust. From a fat/health perspective (excluding the ethics of consuming animal products) I will usually opt for natural products over artificial (hydrogenated and on the verge of being plastic fats etc..) but always do so in moderation. Since I'm pretty lightweight when it comes to using excessive fat in my cooking this philosophy makes it easier to enjoy 'richer' foods from time to time. This recipe can certainly be made with any type of cold fat you choose although I've made it with vegetable oil, without much luck, but again I stress, I'm not a great baker, I don't have the patience or the magic touch. Thanks for a good question, I hope my answer helps and please keep in touch. I'm always happy to hear and learn from viewers! Take care, Toni

Josh
Josh

This looks delicious! I'm usually a high-fat cook (I figure that because I'm a vegetarian, I can afford it) and I notice that you often use lower-fat options where I would pour on the butter and cream. With that in mind, why do you use butter in your crust, rather than vegetable oil based pastry fat? I haven't made much pastry before-- I'm just starting-- and I haven't really worked out the relative benefits of each, so I'm interested to see you use butter. Great show and blog!

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