Tag Archives: and Beans

Tempeh Taco web

Tempeh Chorizo Soft Tacos with all the fixin’s

by Terry Hope Romero    Check out her new cookbook Vegan Eats World

Watch this recipe on Delicious TV’s Vegan Mashup

 

For the Chorizo Tempeh Crumbles

Replace the marinade with the following for spicy chorizo-flavored crumbles for use in Mexican dishes. Prepare saucy chorizo tempeh for eating with rice and beans, or let it simmer for a drier tempeh for use in tacos or quesadillas.

8 ounce package tempeh

2 tablespoons peanut oil

1 ¼ cups vegetable broth

3 cloves garlic, grated or ground into a paste in a mortar and pestle

3 tablespoons soy sauce

2 tablespoons tomato paste

2 teaspoons smoked sweet or hot paprika

1 1/2 teaspoons Mexican chile powder (see page XX)

½ teaspoon liquid smoke

1. Dice the tempeh into 1/2 inch chunks. In large skillet, preheat the peanut oil over medium heat. Stir in the tempeh and fry for 3 minutes or until the edges of the tempeh are lightly browned.

2. In a 2 cup liquid measuring cup whisk together the remaining ingredients. Pour into the skillet, increase the heat to medium high and bring the liquid to a rapid simmer. Cover the pan and simmer for 5 minutes. Uncover the pan and continue to simmer the tempeh, stirring occasionally, for another 5 to 8 minutes. Depending on how saucy you prefer the chorizo tempeh, serve it when it’s saucy and moist or continue to simmer until the liquid has been absorbed by the tempeh for drier crumbles.

The fixin’s

Corn or wheat tortillas

Guacamole

Cashew lime crema: soaked cashews, lime juice, water, salt, garlic

Diced tomatoes, onions, shredded lettuce or cabbage

Add tortillas to a skillet on low heat (you can wrap up to six in some foil and heat them in the skillet or oven at 250 degrees.
Spoon the chorizo tempeh and fixin’s on your tortilla, or better yet let your guest fix their own.

Braised Escarole with White Bean Vinaigrette

By guest chef, Cathi DiCocco

A delicious whole foods dinner by restauranteur Cathi Dicocco.

Cathi grew up cooking in her fathers Italian restaurant in upstate NY.  She is a hidden gem we found in the Maine woods. If you’re ever in Bethel, Maine, stop and visit  Cathi’s restaurant and market

serves 4

To make the Beans:

1 cup of dry beans

1 sprig of rosemary

1 head of garlic, loose skin removed and cut in half through the middle

 Cover dry beans by three inched with cold water and soak in the refrigerator overnight. Drain beans and rinse well. Place the beans in a pot and add 3 cups of cold water. Add the rosemary and the garlic. Bring the beans to a boil for 5 minutes, reduce heat and simmer for one hour or until the beans are tender.  Remove and reserve the garlic halves. Drain the beans, rinse and set aside.

 One cup of dry beans will yield 3 cups of cooked.

Dressing:

3 Cups cooked cannellini beans

¼ cup or more hot water

1 half bulb of the prepared garlic (more to taste)

Juice of ½ lemon

2 teaspoons fresh chopped rosemary

3 tablespoons olive oil

2 teaspoons Balsamic vinegar

Salt and pepper to taste

Process or mash 1 1/2 cup of prepared beans with the hot water. Try to get this as smooth as possible. The consistency should be thin but not watery. Take the prepared garlic and gently squeeze out the softened cloves into the bean “juice”. Mash and blend the garlic. Add the lemon juice, chopped rosemary, olive oil and vinegar. Mix well. Add remaining beans, mash slightly retaining a fair amount of bean texture and gently fold ingredients together in the dressing. Season with salt and pepper to taste and set aside. Prepare escarole.

Escarole:

1 large head of Escarole, cut into quarters

Olive oil

 Bring a large pot of salted water to a boil. Drop in two quarters of escarole. Reduce the heat to a low boil and cook the escarole for 5-7 minutes. Meanwhile preheat a grill to 400 degrees or if you’re grilling the escarole inside preheat a cast iron grill pan for about 5 minutes on high. After 5 minutes lower the preheating grill pan to medium high.  The pan should be very hot but not smoking.

While the escarole is cooking and grill preheating fill a large bowl with cold water and 2 cups of ice.

Using large tongs remove the escarole from the pot, place them into a colander and then immediately plunge them into the cold water bath.  Alternatively you may rinse the escarole under cold running water.  When the escarole has cooled down, about 1 minute, remove the greens and blot very dry in a large clean cotton towel.  If preparing the full head of escarole or 4 portions repeat this process.

Brush one side of the escarole with olive oil and place onto the grill or grill pan, oiled side down. Grill for about 3-4 minutes or until grill marks are visible. Brush the top with oil and flip. Once the underside is nicely grilled, remove the escarole and set onto a serving plate.

Stir the white bean dressing and then spoon the beans onto the escarole. Season the escarole with a generous grating of black pepper and additional olive oil if desired. Serve with crusty garlic bread.

 

Bean Protein made Easier

Cooking Beans

Beans are a very important and incredibly healthy source of protein. Protein is important for everyone and especially for vegetarians. All beans are loaded with fiber, which aids in reducing cholesterol, they’re extremely versatile, and they’re also economical to use.

Historically one of the oldest and most widespread pantry staple, beans are now often overlooked as a healthy and colorful addition to many dishes. So many people I talk to are certain that beans cause digestive disorders, which is unfortunate, often untrue, and easily avoidable. One of the main reasons many high fiber foods like beans may be a digestive challenge is that they are often served undercooked. Though they may look nicer on your plate, they are difficult to digest if they are not thoroughly cooked. One of the most striking things I first noticed about how vegetables are served in Italy is that they all look overcooked. But improperly cooked vegetables – such as broccoli – and undercooked beans compromise digestibility.

When beans are cooked to perfection, they will be creamy inside and out, with absolutely no bite to the skins. In other words, don’t go for al dente when it comes to beans. When cooking beans, I use the quick soak method. You simply bring your beans plus four times their measure of water to a boil for one minute, then turn off the heat, and let them stand for at least an hour. After that, you should cook them thoroughly. Note that not all beans take as long to cook as others. My favorite, creamy cannellini beans, cook much more quickly than, say, pinto beans.

Add salt, vinegar, or win to beans after they’re finished cooking. Adding these beforehand prolongs cooking time and can create a tougher bean “skin.”

Canned beans are quick and can be wonderfully convenient. I try always to use organic, but regardless, unless a recipe specifies otherwise, I drain and rinse canned beans thoroughly before using them.

So for a positive dietary change, try eating more legumes by adding beans to pasta dishes, soups, and salads for that extra protein and fiber punch.

Easy Bean Tips

Easy Bean Tips

Here are some easy tips to make canned beans a workable and delicious part of quick vegetarian meals. Many canned beans only work well if they are to be cooked and mashed because they simply don’t hold up well during the cooking process. But if texture is not an issue then go straight for the can.

In my experience, organic beans are worth the few cents more. If you go for sodium-free, simply add a little fresh salt during the cooking process and you’ll be all set. When using canned bean, all you really have to do is adjust the cooking time in any recipe that calls for fresh beans. When adding beans to soup for example, add the canned beans only during the last ten minutes of cooking time.

One type of bean that I’ve found very little difference in between canned and dried are chickpeas. But as with any canned bean, I suggest rinsing them well and substituting the liquid with vegetable broth.

So keep your pantry stocked, and when you’re in a hurry to make a salad, pasta sauce, or a quick soup, go ahead, open that can, and add the protein, fiber, and nutrition that only beans offer.