Tag Archives: artichokes

Tunno Sandwiches

Recipe by Toni Fiore, the author of the Totally Vegetarian cookbook, and host of the Totally Vegetarian TV show,  also on Roku.Tunno Sandwich72
makes 2 cups 4-6 sandwiches
Ingredients:
14 oz. can artichoke hearts, drained and squeezed fairly dry
1 cup cooked chickpeas rinsed and drained
½ small onion, finely chopped
1 stalk of celery, finely chopped
1 tablespoon nutritional yeast
1-2 teaspoons kelp granules
1 ½ teaspoons soy sauce
1-2 teaspoons unseasoned rice wine vinegar
4-5 tablespoons vegan mayonnaise
Salt and black pepper to taste
To prepare:
Place drained and squeezed artichoke hearts into the bowl of your food processor and pulse to chop, being careful to retain the flaked tuna-like texture – you don’t want a paste! Remove and set the chopped artichokes into a bowl.
To the processor, add the chickpeas and pulse until they have a “mealy” crumbly texture. Add the chopped chickpeas to your bowl of artichokes, then the remaining ingredients and blend well to combine.
Heap onto whole grain bread cover with a crunchy piece of lettuce, and serve.
Total prep: 30 min
Gluten free option, roll salad in lettuce or collard

Spring in Italy

Spring in Italy

I recently returned from my annual spring trip to Italy. Every time I go back, I discover something new, partially because it’s virtually impossible to sample everything in one trip, but also because there are seasonal foods available in different regions. If you travel around the country, you’ll always be sure to come across fresh vegetable dishes prepared in a manner the local populations are accustomed to.

This trip I traveled with a friend and our two middle school aged sons. We went to Lucca with my sister-in-law Daniela and decided to ride our bikes along the great medieval wall that surrounds the city and then to have lunch in one of the local family-run restaurants called a hosteria. In Italy you have ristoranti, trattorias, and hosterias. Historically, each type of eatery has a different purpose and level of formality and therefore offer menu selections that are unique from each other. The place we chose had a limited menu in the sense that not everything you might get in a typical Italian restaurant was available, but the choices were many and each sounded better than the next.

We all selected different dishes so we could sample as much of the available vegetarian fare as possible. Our favorite that day, was a plate of raw baby artichokes, small and tender, sliced very thinly and topped simply with a little salt, olive oil, and shavings of pecorino cheese.

It was a memorable day all around and it just doesn’t get better than that.