Tag Archives: vegetarian kids

Tunno Sandwiches

Recipe by Toni Fiore, the author of the Totally Vegetarian cookbook, and host of the Totally Vegetarian TV show,  also on Roku.Tunno Sandwich72
makes 2 cups 4-6 sandwiches
Ingredients:
14 oz. can artichoke hearts, drained and squeezed fairly dry
1 cup cooked chickpeas rinsed and drained
½ small onion, finely chopped
1 stalk of celery, finely chopped
1 tablespoon nutritional yeast
1-2 teaspoons kelp granules
1 ½ teaspoons soy sauce
1-2 teaspoons unseasoned rice wine vinegar
4-5 tablespoons vegan mayonnaise
Salt and black pepper to taste
To prepare:
Place drained and squeezed artichoke hearts into the bowl of your food processor and pulse to chop, being careful to retain the flaked tuna-like texture – you don’t want a paste! Remove and set the chopped artichokes into a bowl.
To the processor, add the chickpeas and pulse until they have a “mealy” crumbly texture. Add the chopped chickpeas to your bowl of artichokes, then the remaining ingredients and blend well to combine.
Heap onto whole grain bread cover with a crunchy piece of lettuce, and serve.
Total prep: 30 min
Gluten free option, roll salad in lettuce or collard
Tempeh Taco web

Tempeh Chorizo Soft Tacos with all the fixin’s

by Terry Hope Romero    Check out her new cookbook Vegan Eats World

Watch this recipe on Delicious TV’s Vegan Mashup

 

For the Chorizo Tempeh Crumbles

Replace the marinade with the following for spicy chorizo-flavored crumbles for use in Mexican dishes. Prepare saucy chorizo tempeh for eating with rice and beans, or let it simmer for a drier tempeh for use in tacos or quesadillas.

8 ounce package tempeh

2 tablespoons peanut oil

1 ¼ cups vegetable broth

3 cloves garlic, grated or ground into a paste in a mortar and pestle

3 tablespoons soy sauce

2 tablespoons tomato paste

2 teaspoons smoked sweet or hot paprika

1 1/2 teaspoons Mexican chile powder (see page XX)

½ teaspoon liquid smoke

1. Dice the tempeh into 1/2 inch chunks. In large skillet, preheat the peanut oil over medium heat. Stir in the tempeh and fry for 3 minutes or until the edges of the tempeh are lightly browned.

2. In a 2 cup liquid measuring cup whisk together the remaining ingredients. Pour into the skillet, increase the heat to medium high and bring the liquid to a rapid simmer. Cover the pan and simmer for 5 minutes. Uncover the pan and continue to simmer the tempeh, stirring occasionally, for another 5 to 8 minutes. Depending on how saucy you prefer the chorizo tempeh, serve it when it’s saucy and moist or continue to simmer until the liquid has been absorbed by the tempeh for drier crumbles.

The fixin’s

Corn or wheat tortillas

Guacamole

Cashew lime crema: soaked cashews, lime juice, water, salt, garlic

Diced tomatoes, onions, shredded lettuce or cabbage

Add tortillas to a skillet on low heat (you can wrap up to six in some foil and heat them in the skillet or oven at 250 degrees.
Spoon the chorizo tempeh and fixin’s on your tortilla, or better yet let your guest fix their own.

IMG_9493Citrus Salad web

Orange Fennel Salad with Toasted Fennel Vinaigrette

by Toni Fiore, the author of the Totally Vegetarian cookbook, and host of the Totally Vegetarian TV show,  now online.

Watch this recipe being made on Delicious TV’s Vegan Mashup.

Fennel has such a lovely flavor it’s a shame it isn’t used more often. I love it roasted and raw and paired with just about anything! Fennel becomes soft and sweet when roasted yet maintains it’s crunchy texture in salads longer than just about anything! For kids, or anyone really, new to fennel a simple fruit salad like this is a great place to start. Fennel pairs amazingly well with sweet oranges. I prefer a lighter dressing like the vinaigrette in this recipe, however feel free to use your own favorite.

Ingredients:

2  Oranges

1 t. Fennel Seeds

3 T Olive Oil,

1 T white wine vinegar

1/2 t Sea Salt, or to taste

1 medium Fennel Bulb

to prepare:

Thinly slice the fennel bulb. Reserve fronds.

A few rings of thinly sliced red onion, or chopped fresh parsley(optional)

Slice the rind and pith completely off of the oranges. Next slice the oranges 1/4″ thick.

Toast the fennel seeds for a few minutes until the aroma is nicely released and they change color slightly.  Crush well in a mortar & pestle or grind in a small spice grinder or coffee grinder.

Combine ground fennel seeds, olive oil, vinegar, and sea salt in a small bowl and whisk to mix.

Layer orange slices and sliced fennel bulb on serving plates.  Quickly re-mix vinaigrette then dress oranges and fennel. Garnish with arugula.*

Another option for salad – Layer in a lot more arugula to have a more greens-heavy salad. The peppery taste of the arugula compliments the sweet oranges and anise fennel.

Edamame Apple Salad

Typically soybeans in their dried form must be cooked at length in order to become digestible. But edamame (or green soybeans) are harvested at the peak of ripeness, which makes them soft, chewy and ready to eat in just minutes.

The word edamame means “Beans on Branches,” since they grow in clusters on bushy branches. If you take a closer look at the pods, they’re quite fuzzy. To retain their fresh, natural flavor, they are typically parboiled and quick-frozen.

Soybeans are a major source of protein in Asia and are rapidly gaining in popularity in the US. I see them served in restaurants and have them offered me at dinner parties. Edamame are often consumed as a snack, used in side vegetable dishes or in soups. Children like them for their wonderful chewy texture and mild, somewhat sweet flavor. Another reason why they’re so popular with children is that they’re a fun finger food.

To prepare whole Edamame pods, simply cook the whole bean pods in salted water, drain, top with a sprinkle of coarse salt and then squeeze the beans directly from the pods into your mouth. If you’re buying them frozen, follow the package directions because many are sold already partially cooked and they simply need a quick reheating.

These days edamame are available pretty much everywhere, either in the pod or shelled and ready to use. If your children like them, incorporate them into their diets in as many ways possible. Edamame in any form are incredibly nutritious, loaded with protein, high in fiber, and relatively low in carbs. Below is a quick and flexible salad recipe that can be adapted as you wish.

Ingredients:
1/4 c. seasoned sushi rice vinegar
1 T. light vegetable oil
1/4 t. salt
1/8 t. freshly ground black pepper
1 pkg. (about 16 ounces) frozen, shelled edamame
1 Granny Smith apple, cut into 1/4 inch dice (Jicama or radish can be substituted)
1/2-1 c. lightly packed chopped fresh cilantro (optional)

To prepare:
Mix the oil, vinegar, and seasonings in a large bowl. Cook the edamame according to the package directions, then place in the bowl with the chopped apple and the cilantro and toss to coat the vegetables with the dressing.

Healthy Snacks for Kids on Yahoo

For all those people who have given carbs a bad rap and focused far too much on protein, this is an interesting little bit of news. It’s not earth-shaking, but for the mainstream media, it’s not half bad. A far cry from what we usually read…you’ll notice a general lack of animal products listed (any hot chocolate can be made with soymilk, if desired) and an emphasis on fruits, vegetables, and fiber. Perhaps we are making some progress? Now, if we can just convince the kids.

8 Study Snacks That Make Kids Smarter

Vegetarian Kids

Vegetarian Kids

I was reading a few prominent internet articles this week about nutrition and promoting healthy foods for kids. Over ninety percent of the recipes suggested in the articles contain dairy and cheese, swap out chicken for beef, and promote substituting turkey for just about everything except shampoo. America’s ongoing romantic relationship with meat and dairy is both disturbing and dangerous. The idea that one might consider eating meat or dairy free at least three times a week is a concept that pushes people into panic mode. However, amidst all of this chaotic and conflicting information, I was heartened to learn that there has been a remarkable increase in college student demand and desire to eat vegan and vegetarian.

Nearly one quarter of college students are vegetarian and sales of vegetarian meals at Universities doubled between 1998 and 2003 and continue to grow. This is good news and very telling. Conversely, while these future consumers are busy helping create a multibillion dollar mock meat industry there is little response and advice from mainstream nutritional “experts” to assist parents in preparing and creating meatless meals at home that address this current trend. Despite the fact that we still find it a challenge to sell the concept of an all vegetarian cooking show, it appears, when we look at the facts, vegetarians might just turn out to be a powerful economic force to be reckoned with.

Light and Healthy Vegetables

Light and Healthy Vegetables

White vegetables and grains have the unfortunate reputation that they’re lacking in vitamins, minerals, and overall basic nutrition. Not true! Today’s blog subject is one of my favorite white vegetables: the noble cauliflower. Cauliflower is virtually fat free, low in calories and loaded with phytonutrients. Like its close relative broccoli, cauliflower is also a cruciferous vegetable, which means it contains strong cancer fighting nutrients.

One reason I like cauliflower so much is that it has a sweet, mild flavor and great texture. It’s great in stirfries, mashed, added to soups, or steamed and browned in olive oil. And, if you’re having a hard time getting your children to try vegetables, try mixing steamed cauliflower into cooked potatoes before mashing or make a dairy-free rich and creamy soup using puréed cauliflower topped with toasted almonds. I’ve found that heart healthy nuts added nutrient rich, mildly flavored cauliflower are a winning combination for most children.